Short Course Catalogue - Geology

 

Geology - Structural Geology

Structural Geology

Geology for Non-Geologists

Instructor: Dr George Bertram (Stratigraphic Research Int.)

The course comprises a series of talks on the fundamentals of geology interspersed with short practical exercises and discussions. The objective of the course is to introduce attendees to the science of geology with a particular emphasis on its application for the exploration of hydrocarbons.

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Geological Evolution of Tethys Domains and Surroundings Since the Late Palaeozoic

Instructor: Mr Eric Barrier (NCOC)

This course describes the tectono-sedimentary and geodynamic evolution of the Tethys and Peri-Tethys domains, including the basics, platforms and orogenic belts that developed since the Late Palaeozoic (post-Hercynian evolution). The investigated region includes Northeastern Africa, Near East, the whole Middle East, Caucasus and Western Central Asia. In the course, the regional evolution is integrated in geodynamic and kinematic context of the openings and closures of the oceanic Palaeo- and then Neo-Tethys domains. One of the main objectives is understanding the tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of the continental Peri-Tethys basins and platforms. We particularly focus on the relationships between tectonic and sedimentation in the basins that developed in these continental domains. The geological history of the main basins and belts are described and discussed at length. The origin and evolution of the major sedimentary basins are more particularly described (timing, rifting, subsidence, inversion, sedimentology, environment, sedimentation, …). The relationships between the main kinematic changes and the major regional tectonic events are debated. The course integrated the most recent data from research projects and literature. It is widely illustrated with palaeotectonic maps and reconstructions, figures, diagrams and pictures. Several case study examples are more detailed and debated.

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Geology - Carbonate Geology

Carbonate Geology

Carbonate Essentials: Pores to Prospect

Instructor: Dr Christopher Liner (University of Arkansas)

This course is an overview of carbonates from geology to seismic interpretation, with particular emphasis on karst topography and seismic expression thereof. Carbonate reservoirs represent over 60% of worldwide petroleum reserves, including emerging unconventional reservoirs. Unlike clastics, carbonate mineralogy is relatively simple, while complexity arises from depositional environment lateral variability, pore structure, digenesis and dissolution. These factors influence bulk rock properties and, in turn, seismic response. The course offers a broad overview of carbonate geology and properties that are mappable on a seismic scale as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. To illustrate key concepts, field sites and case histories are presented from global locations.

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Geological History of CO2: Carbon Cycle and Natural Sequestration of CO2

Instructor: Dr Alain-Yves Huc (UPMC - Paris VI University)

With respect to the current genuine public concern regarding the anthropogenic increase of greenhouse gases, a great deal of research and technology development focuses on the capture and underground storage of industrial quantities of CO2. In addition, interest is attracted by the natural processes controlling the carbon cycle and the associated fate of atmospheric CO2. The impact of the natural bio-geological processes affecting the CO2 diluted in the atmosphere at a global scale, needs to be carefully considered in order to assess its role in the current and future state the atmosphere of our planet. As a complement to the study of the involved factors in the modern terrestrial eco-system, the geological perspective provides the opportunity to investigate these processes, their consequences and their kinetics at different time scales.

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Recognition of Sedimentary Environment from Primary Structures in Outcrop and Core

Instructor: Dr Janrik van den Berg (Utrecht University and ENRES International)

Knowledge of the physical background of the preserved structures is a prerequisite to understand the mutual relations of structures found in cores that guide us in interpretation solutions and that help us to keep our imagination of the paleo-environment within realistic borders.
First the physical background of sedimentary structures produced by flowing water or waves is treated. These are the “building stones" of any depositional facies or depositional sequence. A proper and accurate interpretation of these in terms of bedforms and flow conditions is essential for understanding the origin and development of any depositional facies or depositional sequence.
After this focus is laid on special structures and vertical successions of structures that characterize fluvial, tidal and transitional fluvial-tidal environments. With transgression and regression, the facies of transitional sediments will move up and down the lower river reach. Recognizing these deposits is important as in sequence stratigraphy they permit a more precise determination of maximum flooding surfaces.

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Top Seals and Fault Seals in Clastic and Carbonate Reservoirs: A Practical Approach

Instructor: Dr Dirk Nieuwland (NewTec International)

The core of this course is a new powerful method of fault seal prediction and is intended for geologists, geophysicists and reservoir engineers in exploration. The course is based on geomechanics as a sound foundation for structural geological concepts and the behaviour of rocks in the brittle regime. Mechanical rock properties and ways and means to determine these properties form an important element of this course. Following an introduction to geomechanics, the theory of fracturing of brittle, ductile and viscous rocks is treated, illustrated with field examples and case histories. Different deformation mechanisms, based on mechanical rock properties, are treated in relation to realistic geological environments. Cataclasis is introduced as a major sealing mechanism, including a detailed account of the cataclasis process. Palaeo-stress analysis is introduced, together with a new tool, the reactivation circle. The course is very practical and oriented on application. An exercise based on real data forms an important element of the course. Cases requiring the use of numerical models are discussed, but numerical modelling does not form part of the course.

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Geology - Stratigraphy

Stratigraphy

Integrated Methods for Deep-Water Reservoir Characterization

Instructor: Dr. Jon R. Rotzien (Basin Dynamics, LLC)

Deep-water depositional systems form some of the largest petroleum reservoirs on Earth and represent the frontier of oil and gas exploration. However, deep-water depositional systems remain the least well understood because sediment gravity flows, including turbidity currents to hybrid and debris flows, are both infrequent and difficult to predict and monitor, setting them apart from sediment transport processes occurring on mountain tops to shallow marine settings. Therefore, modern seismic data, and, in particular, deep-water outcrops provide prime sources of stratigraphic data used to risk drilling targets and build reservoir models at every phase in the upstream exploration and production process. This course focuses on sub-bed-scale to field-scale architectural elements in deep-water depositional systems and how they affect the main risks in deep-water E&P across the value chain: reservoir presence, deliverability, seals and traps.

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Introduction to Sequence Stratigraphy

Instructor: Dr Gary Hampson (Imperial College London)

Sequence stratigraphy is now a well-established analytical tool for investigating sedimentary successions, with the aim of predicting the distribution of reservoir, source rock and seal lithologies. Over the last 20 years, concepts that were originally developed from seismic reflection data have been refined by application to wireline-log, core and reservoir production datasets.

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More from Seismic – a Workshop on Seismic Stratigraphic Techniques

Instructor: Dr George Bertram (Stratigraphic Research Int.)

Seismic data contains a wealth of information if you know where and how to look for it. Using a number of seismic based examples and 'hands on” interpretation exercises from different geological settings worldwide, attendees will learn how to identify different depositional environments, predict facies, (especially reservoir, source rock and seal) measure water depths, calculate subsidence trends, recognize and quantify sea-level changes and, where appropriate, determine the paleo weather conditions. Issues of flattening and datuming to improve the understanding basin evolution will also be addressed.

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Geology - Geological Modeling

Geological Modeling

Non-Linear Geostatistics for Reservoir Modelling

Instructors: Prof. Dr Stephen Tyson and Dr Ing Sebastian Hörning (Universiti Teknologi Brunei and The University of Queensland)

The course will show the attendees how to test for linear spatial dependence and introduce the concepts of non-linear geostatistics. Attendees will develop an excel spreadsheet and a python notebook which can be used for spatial data analysis and non-linear stochastic simulation. Existing geostatistics algorithms based on the kriging matrix can be shown to underestimate the connectivity of extreme values because they assume a linear spatial dependence model. Moreover, the estimation of uncertainty based on these techniques uses the kriging variance, which is not dependent on the values of the spatially distributed variable. It can also be shown that these uncertainty estimate are often implausible. This course will explain the reasons why most spatial variables in geoscience do not have a linear spatial dependence, even after monotonic transformations, and what the impact of this in the estimation of petrophysical properties. The course will show the attendees how to test for linear spatial dependence and introduce the concepts of non-linear geostatistics. Attendees will develop an Excel spreadsheet and a python notebook which can be used for spatial data analysis and non-linear stochastic simulation.

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Well Test Analysis

Instructor: Prof. Shiyi Zheng (London South Bank University)

This course on well test analysis will provide attendees basic knowledge on the subject. The course will start with a review of an oil field life from exploration, appraisal, development and abandonment to define the role of well testing. The history and clear definition of the subject will also be given as the summary of this introduction. The course will cover classic, modern and numerical well testing concepts and techniques.

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Basin and Petroleum Systems Modelling: Applications for Petroleum Exploration Risk and Resource Assessments

Instructor: Dr Bjorn Wygrala (Schlumberger)

The term “Petroleum Systems” and the technology “Basin and Petroleum Systems Modelling” will be introduced by showing applications in areas with critical exploration challenges, including salt basins and thrustbelts. Technical breakthroughs in the last 10-15 years have been the extension of the technology from 2D to 3D, and the ability to perform multi-phase petroleum migration modelling using different methods in high resolution geological models. This enables temperature, pressure and petroleum property predictions to be made with higher levels of accuracy and in the most complex geological environments such as in the sub-salt or in thrustbelts. Case studies will be used with live software presentations to illustrate key points. Applications of the technology will range from frontier exploration in which large areas with only sparse data are screened, to detailed assessments of exploration risks in structurally complex areas, to petroleum resource assessments of yet-to-find oil and gas.

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Best Practice in Pore Fluid Pressure and Fracture Pressure Prediction

Instructor: Prof. Dr Richard Swarbrick (Swarbrick GeoPressure Consultancy)

All wells drilled require a pre-drill prediction of pore fluid and fracture pressures which defines the drilling window. This course explains the objectives, methods and uncertainties of prediction, based on extensive global experience. The necessary understanding of the geological/geophysical context of abnormal pressures leading to standard algorithms will be provided. Part of the challenge is terminology and contrasting display methods of geoscience and operations/drilling groups. Both approaches are necessary and investigated in the interactive exercises which will form an essential component of the course.

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Natural Fracture Systems and Fractured Hydrocarbon Accumulations, Mechanics and Management

Instructor: Dr Dirk Nieuwland (NewTec International)

Unconventional hydrocarbon systems require unconventional approaches to decide on drilling locations and development techniques. The information contained in natural fracture systems can be used to support the drilling and well stimulation technique for the development of unconventional hydrocarbon systems such as shale gas. This short course is based on geomechanics as a technique that can be used to understand and to develop unconventional hydrocarbon systems such as shale gas systems, and fractured crystalline basement, where conventional logging and seismic systems are inadequate.

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3D Reservoir Modelling of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

Instructor: Dr Tim Wynn (AGR-Petroleum Services)

Reservoir modelling for field development planning is a well-accepted process but its application to fractured reservoirs requires specific considerations which are less commonly known. This course describes a practical methodology for building 3D static (“geocellular”) reservoir models for naturally fractured reservoirs using standard modelling software, covering such considerations. The issues addressed include the integration of log, core and seismic data, the sourcing and application of in situ stress data, the process of defining and building the static reservoir model itself, and the creation of output in a form appropriate for dynamic modelling using dual porosity reservoir simulators where appropriate. More complex workflows using discrete fracture networks will also be summarised, as will general issues of fracture description, uncertainty-handling and volumetrics.

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Deepwater Reservoirs: Exploration and Production Concepts

Instructor: Prof. Dorrik Stow (Heriot-Watt University)

Sandstones deposited in deep marine environments form important hydrocarbon reservoirs in many basins around the world. Interbedded mudstones can be important as source rocks, as well as acting as barriers, baffles and seals. Deepwater reservoirs are currently the principal target for oil and gas exploration, with over 1600 existing turbidite fields and plays.

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