List of DLP Webinars

Available webinars

 

Wavefield Reconstruction Inversion – a New Perspective on FWI

DLP Webinars on Geophysics

Near-Field Measurements Versus Far-Field Estimations of Air Gun Array Sound Pressure Levels
Instructor Philip M. Fontana
Duration 40 minutes Webinar + Q&A
Main topic(s) Geophysics - Absolute sound pressure measures from air gun sources using calibrated near-field hydrophones compared to levels predicted by far-field signature computer models
 Sub Topic(s)  Measured levels vs published sound pressure (SPL) and sound exposure (SEL) guidelines used by regulators
Language English

 

Webinar description

During the past 25 years or so there has been steadily increasing concerns about potential impacts from sound levels emitted by seismic survey air gun arrays on marine fauna, cetaceans in particular.
These concerns have spurred increasing activity in research efforts to characterize the sound fields generated by air gun arrays and the propagation of the emitted acoustic energy in the marine environment local to a seismic survey.
In parallel, many government agencies responsible for granting seismic survey permits have included acoustic monitoring and mitigation procedures as part of the permit requirements. Most permit applications require a description of the seismic source and an estimate of the expected acoustic output from the source. Typically, the acoustic source levels submitted with the applications are derived from computer model estimates of the Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) generated in the far-field of a specific air gun array design. These levels are then often used as input to compute monitoring and mitigation parameters.
This approach has an inherent set of problems in that the estimated far-field SPLs are then extrapolated back to a virtual receiver point 1m from a virtual point source. The key word is virtual and the problem is that the quoted acoustic levels for the virtual point source never actually occur in the environment. The reason is that an air gun array, by design, has a spatial distribution of elements that do not behave as a point source emitter at 1m from the geometric center of the array. Therefore, the point source estimate only becomes valid at some distance away from the center of the array where the arrivals from each of the individual array elements add together coherently and appear as if the total energy is emanating from a single point source emitter at a distance. In words that is the definition of the far-field of an array. In general terms the far-field distance can be computed as:
                       d= (f * a2)/c

Where f is frequency in Hz; a is the greatest spatial dimension of the array; c is the speed of sound in water (Richardson et al, 1995).

Distances of d and greater are referred to as the far-field of the array. Distances less than d are referred to as the near-field of the array.

Notice that the far-field distance is a function of frequency, the higher the frequency the greater the far-field distance criteria. Therefore the actual overall bandwidth of air gun emissions becomes an important component to consider.

In this lecture we will present a set of absolute SPL measurements attained from calibrated near-field hydrophones mounted in proximity to each element in an air gun array. From these measurements we will document the maximum SPL generated by each element in an array and in the near-field of a full array in a production environment. We will then use those values to extrapolate SPL and estimated SEL to the far-field for various source configurations in different shooting scenarios such as sequential, overlapping, and simultaneous.

As an integration of SPL over time, the SEL issue is interesting in addressing questions regarding the environmental and geophysical issues resulting from shooting smaller sources more often.

 

Participants' Profile

Specifically interesting for operational geophysicists and HSE advisors in E&P and seismic contractor companies.

 

About the Lecturer

Phil FontanaPhil M. Fontana holds BS and MS degrees in Geological Sciences from the University of Connecticut in the USA.

Has held the position of Chief Geophysicist at Polarcus since December 2008. Prior to that, starting in 1984, he has held senior technical positions in   support of marine acquisition at Western Geophysical, WesternGeco, Veritas DGC, and CGGVeritas.

 

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Making the Transition from Discrete Shot Records to Continuous Wavefields
Instructor Tilman Klüver
Duration 60 minutes Webinar + Q&A
Main topic(s) A marine seismic data acquisition and processing methodology will be explained and demonstrated that makes use of continuous source and receiver side wavefields
Language English

 

Webinar description

In this webinar, a marine seismic method that makes use of continuous wavefields on both the source and receiver side is explained. On the receiver side, data from typically one sail line is recorded continuously and treated as one long record in processing. The method treats source wavefields that can be emitted continuously over the length of the sail line while moving. The method will be explained and demonstrated with synthetic and real data examples acquired with densely triggered single air-guns. The method significantly reduces sound pressure and exposure levels compared to acquisition with standard sized air-gun arrays. Multiple sources distributed in the cross-line direction can be treated effectively. Thereby, cross-line source sampling of towed streamer data can be improved and acquisition efficiency increased.

 

Participants' Profile

This webinar is for anybody with an interest in marine seismic data acquisition and/or the reduction of its environmental imprint.

 

About the Lecturer

Tilman KluverDr. Tilman Klüver studied geophysics at the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, and received his diploma in 2004. In 2007, he received a doctor degree in natural sciences from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. He joined PGS in 2007 as a research geophysicist and has worked on various seismic acquisition and processing related topics since then. He is currently a senior research geophysicist based in Oslo, Norway.

 

 

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Grane – Better seismic imaging: Low price for higher production!
Instructor: Mr. Asbjørn Sæbø
Duration: 45 min Webinar + 30 min Q&A
Main Topic(s): Seismic processing, Well planning
Sub Topic(s):

PSDM (Pre Stack Depth Migration),

VOI (Value of Information),

Demultiple, Noise reduction,

PRM (Permanent Reservoir Monitoring)

Language: English
Date + Time:
see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

The decision to do a seismic (re-)processing is unfortunately often evaluated too much on cost, and not on the possible upsides gained from a dataset of higher quality.

The lecture shows the importance of high quality seismic data for well planning, and the VOI (Value of Information) of these data.

Seismic reprocessing using modern algorithms gives an improved imaging, and hence a possibility for planning better wells with more optimal positioning. The increased value and larger success rate of these new wells together with the increased understanding of older wells, shows that the value of the reprocessed seismic data could be as high as $ 0.2 billion, approximately 100 times the investment.

A case study from the Grane-field is used as an illustration of the above. Unstable shales in the Grane-reservoir often causes drilling challenges, which can give reduced well lengths and hence lost income. These shales are often below seismic resolution, or are difficult to image due to steeply dipping geological structures.

The case study shows how the reprocessed seismic data enables the placement of a well in a part of the reservoir which two earlier wells had failed to reach due to unexpected shales. This part of the reservoir has reserves worth ~$45 millionPRM-data (Permanent Reservoir Monitoring) confirms that the reservoir target is reached, that the geological structure is according to the updated interpretation, and that the well is producing from the full length.

Participants' Profile

Geophysicists, Cross disiplinary, Geologists

About the Lecturer 

Asbjorn SaeboAsbjørn Sæbø completed his Master’s degree in Acoustics, Signal processing and Electronics at NTH (Norwegian Institute of Technology) in 1991. He joined Geco-Prakla immediately afterwards as a seismic data processing geophysicist. He continued in the role of project group leader for seismic processing until moving to Norsk Hydro Research in Bergen in 2002, working with Inversion and Model based seismic processing. In 2004 he got the opportunity to work as a geophysicist in the Grane-asset, with seismic interpretation, well planning, and seismic processing as main tasks. He is now with the Marginal Field group in Equinor, developing new fields.

 

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The construction of a reliable, high-resolution subsurface model using FWI: a Sultanate of Oman case study
Instructor Gillian Royle
Duration 1 hour Webinar + 30 min Q&A
Main Topic(s): Land FWI, vibroseis data processing, FWI Workflows
Sub Topic(s):
Model-building
Language English
Date + Time
see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

Applications of full waveform inversion (FWI) to land data exhibit specific challenges associated with elastic effects and near surface heterogeneities. Even if recent dense land acquisition designs, with long offsets, large azimuths and very low frequencies down to 1.5 Hz (Mahrooqi et al, 2012), offer ideal conditions for FWI compared to marine cases, very few land FWI case studies have been published. The first published results of land FWI applications to these new and exceptional datasets are very encouraging (Stopin et al., 2014) and demonstrate the capability of FWI to build, in a robust and efficient way, the long wavelength components of the velocity model using diving waves and basic data pre-processing. In these case studies the resulting velocity model is proposed as a starting point for reflection-based tomography. However, some limitations are identified in the capability to interpret high frequencies (> 6 Hz) and reflected waves using the acoustic assumption.

In this lecture I describe the application of FWI to a large broadband 3D wide-azimuth vibroseis land survey acquired by Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) in 2014. I demonstrate with this dataset that it is possible to obtain a reliable result of comparable resolution to FWI applications on marine data. This high-resolution velocity model is obtained by incorporating reflections in addition to diving waves, and running acoustic VTI FWI up to 13 Hz. The acoustic approximation is indeed severe for land acquisitions, but here is mitigated by proper data pre-processing that I discuss in detail. Starting models are generated by joint diving wave and reflection tomography in order to properly estimate anisotropy.  FWI is applied in two stages: initially applied on diving waves with maximum frequencies of 3 Hz to 9 Hz, and subsequently applied on reflections and diving waves combined and with maximum frequencies of 6 Hz to 13 Hz. A striking uplift in model resolution, seen in the recovery of channels and faults, is observed following the second stage of FWI. The migrated results are compared to those obtained with a velocity model obtained by classical ray based migration velocity analysis, and show improved reflection continuity and flatness below faults and at depth. Pre-stack depth migration gathers using the FWI result show flatness and continuity, and attest to the reliability of the subsurface model.

Participants' Profile

Those interested in full waveform inversion applications to land acquisitions, vibroseis data pre-processing, model building, and the impact of data quality and data type on model resolution.

About the Lecturer 

Gillian Royle received her PhD in Geophysics, specializing in multi-parameter full waveform inversion on ocean-bottom cable data, at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. In 2009 she joined ExxonMobil Upstream Research as a research specialist for three years before returning to France to join CGG, where she currently works as a senior research geophysicist. Her main activity is in developments and applications of full waveform inversion to on-shore seismic acquisitions.

 

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Resolution, Resolution, Resolution - An Ultra-High Resolution Seismic Case Study from the Barents Sea
Instructor Mikaël Garden
Duration 45 min Webinar + 15 min Q&A
Main Topic(s): Geophysics
Sub Topic(s):
Seismic Acquisition, Seismic Processing
Language English

Webinar description

Advances in ultra-high resolution (UHR) seismic technology means that resulting data is useful beyond site surveys and surface hazard identification. The technique has now conquered a few basins on the planet including the Gulf of Mexico and the Barents Sea where it has proven its value in development projects. 

This lecture will recount OMV’s experience with UHR seismic acquisition in the Barents Sea over the Wisting discovery. It will be articulated around four parts as all good seismic stories are: survey design, operations, data processing and inversion. It will start with the reasons why UHR was chosen, the “unreasonable” requirements for resolution impossible to achieve with conventional seismic. Some aspects of the seismic operations will follow to explain how operations were successful in this harsh environment. Then, the two proofs of the puddings, with examples to demonstrate the added value of UHR on both seismic data itself and inverted volumes.

Participants' Profile

The webinar is of interest to geophysicists contemplating the idea of working with, or just curious about, ultra-high resolution seismic data.

About the Lecturer

Mikaël Garden completed his Master’s degree in Geophysics from School and Observatory for Earth Sciences (EOST), Strasbourg, France in 1998. He then spent 17 years working for Schlumberger. He first spent a few years in R&D developing tools for joint inversion of surface seismic and gradiometry data in the US. He then learnt the ropes of seismic data acquisition from crews both offshore (Mediterranean Sea, West Africa, North Sea, Barents Sea) and onshore (Oman) before providing a geophysical support to WesternGeco’s seismic operations from the comfort of an office (UK, Malaysia and USA). Finally, he moved to seismic data processing (USA and UAE). Having seen all aspects of seismic from a contractor perspective, Mikaël decided to join an operator and he has been planning and supervising all of OMV’s seismic operations for the last three years, based in Austria.

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Quantitative Prediction of Injected CO2 at Sleipner Using Wave-Equation Based AVO
Instructor: Peter Haffinger
Duration: 45-60 minutes Webinar + 15 minutes Q&A
Disciplines: Wave-Equation Based AVO, Quantitative Prediction of Reservoir Fluids
Language: English
Date & Time: see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

This lecture is mainly concerned with the quantitative prediction of reservoir fluids in the subsurface and to this purpose the concept of wave-equation based AVO (WEB-AVO) inversion will be discussed. While conventional AVO technologies are usually based on the linearised Zoeppritz equations, WEB-AVO solves the full elastic wave-equation. Effectively, the technology becomes a true amplitude AVO scheme that properly takes complex wave-propagation effects as internal multiple scattering and mode conversion into account.
Another aspect that will be treated is the use of compressibility and shear compliance (inverses of bulk modulus and shear modulus) as parameters for reservoir characterisation. While acoustic impedance, shear impedance and/or vp/vs are mostly used in this context, WEB-AVO solves for compressibility and shear compliance since the wave-equation is formulated in these terms. What sounds like a necessity turns into added value since these parameters are highly sensitive to porosity and pore fill (compressibility) but also to lithology (shear compliance).
The presented technology will be demonstrated on a seismic field dataset from the Sleipner Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) project. WEB-AVO was used to quantitatively estimate the amount of injected CO2 in 2008 and the results are in good accordance with the reported figures from the operating company.

 

Participants' Profile

- Geoscientists involved in seismic reservoir characterisation
- Geoscientists in the field of CO2 capture, storage and sequestration
- Geoscientists with an interest in alternative parameters for reservoir characterisation
- Professionals/students interested in new technologies

 

About the Lecturer

Peter HaffingerBefore becoming a co-founder of Delft Inversion in 2013, Peter received a Ph.D. from Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) for his work on full waveform inversion in general but also for specific applications to the reservoir. He was among the first year students of the International Joint Master programme in Applied Geophysics, organised by the IDEA League and including educational stays at TU Delft, ETH Zurich and RWTH Aachen. As part of his career he performed research for Western Geco in Gatwick, UK as well as the Saudi Aramco EXPEC Advanced Research Centre in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. With the team of Delft Inversion his ambition is to establish the next generation AVO technology in the field of seismic reservoir characterisation.
 

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Automatic salt interface refinement using RTM time-shift gathers
Instructor Raanan Dafni, PhD
Duration 30 min Webinar + 15 min Q&A
Main Topic(s): Geophysics
Sub Topic(s):
Sub-salt imaging, Seismic Interpretation, Exploit image gathers for interpretation
Language English

Webinar description

The quality of sub-salt seismic imaging strongly depends on an accurate interpretation of the salt-sediment interface. Seemingly, small errors or missing details in the interface’s geometry can severely degrade the image quality.

The lecture delineates a method for automatic refinement of the salt-sediment interface by capturing its small-scale details and complexity. The goal is to make the velocity model building structurally consistent with the image. The method makes use of information extracted from time-shift image gathers produced by reverse-time migration (RTM). Time-lags in the image gathers are translated into spatial shifts of the salt interface. As a result, the image of the updated interface shifts to zero time-lag in the gathers.

In areas of high structural complexity, pre-stack image gathers may supplement and enhance the traditional post-stack interpretation of the subsurface structure. Time-shift image gathers seems to be a useful resource for such enhancement. The concept is demonstrated via 2D synthetic examples, and is applicable similarly for 3D refinement as well.

Participants' Profile

The webinar provides a common ground of interest for those in the field of: geophysics, geology, seismic processing, seismic interpretation, velocity model building.

About the Lecturer 

Raanan Dafni received his PhD in Geophysics from Tel-Aviv University in 2015. He spent the past few years as a postdoctoral research associate at Rice University, Houston. Raanan is currently the R&D team leader of Paradigm-Emerson’s seismic imaging software. His current research interest includes seismic migration, seismic inversion, velocity model building, automatic interpretation, machine learning.

 

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Visco-Acoustic Full Waveform Inversion
Instructor: René-Édouard Plessix
Duration: 1 hour + 15 minutes Q&A
Main Topic(s): Seismic full waveform inversion
Sub Topic(s):
Time-domain visco modelling, real data imaging
Language: English
Date + Time:
see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

Acoustic full waveform inversion is nowadays an established technology to determine velocity background images from low-frequency and long-offset data sets with a focus on the diving waves. While anisotropy is often accounted for, dispersion and absorption effects are more often ignored. In this seminar, I discuss a visco-acoustic multi-parameter full waveform inversion.

After a briefly introduction on seismic attenuation and dispersion, I review a time-domain implementation of the visco-acoustic wave equation. I also briefly describe the inversion approach based on the adjoint state technique. With the help of a synthetic study, I then describe the advantages and issues we encounter when inverting for both velocity and quality factor. This synthetic study illustrates the trade-off between velocity and quality factor through sequential and simultaneous inversions. I finally present a visco-acoustic full waveform inversion on a data set recorded offshore Malaysia where gas pockets are presented in the sub-surface

Participants' Profile

The seminar is of interest to people working on seismic imaging and notably on seismic full waveform inversion.

About the Lecturer:

Rene-Edouard Plessix

René-Edouard Plessix is a civil engineer from École des Mines de Saint-Étienne and received a ph.D in applied mathematics from the university of Paris-IX Dauphine in 1996. After a year in the research center of Amoco, he joined Shell research and development center in 1998 and he is currently a principal researcher. His main activity is on geophysical imaging. He notably worked on seismic and electromagnetic modeling and inversion. His main focus is currently on seismic full waveform inversion. He also serves as associate editor of Geophysical Prospecting and Geophysical Journal International.

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DLP Webinars on Reservoir Characterization

Applied Oilfield Geomechanics
Instructor Jörg Herwanger
Duration 1 hr + 15 minutes Q&A
Disciplines Geomechanics, Wellbore stability, Fracture containment, Fault Stability
Language English
Date and time see calendar of webinars or on request

 

Webinar description

This lecture is a case study of building and calibrating a 3D geomechanical model for a deepwater reservoir, and subsequent application of the model for decisions in support of field development planning and reservoir management.

In the first part of the webinar, I discuss a range of topics of practical relevance in building and calibration of 3D geomechanical models. These topics include the use of seismic inversion attributes for building a 3D mechanical property model; the integration of well-log data and seismic data and their differences in resolution; the use of image logs, caliper logs and leak-off tests in geomechanical model calibration; and ensuring that the information from 1D well-based geomechanical models can be fully utilized in a 3D finite element geomechanical model.

The applications of the geomechanical model discussed in this webinar include:
(i) Wellbore stability assessment for drilling inclined infill wells. I analyse the drilling of an inclined well with a stuck-pipe event. This event can be traced back to wellbore failure. With the suggested increase in mudweight from the geomechanical model, a sidetrack was successfully drilled;
(ii) Assessment of maximum allowable injection pressures during hydraulic stimulation to avoid out-of-zone growth of hydraulic fractures. Here I discuss the influence of mechanical stratigraphy on horizontal stress magnitudes and principal controls on fracture containment;
(iii) Evaluation of the risk of fault re-activation during a range of production scenarios, in order to establish safe operational limits.

 

Participants' Profile

The webinar presents a case study integrating data and models from a wide range of subsurface disciplines in the O&G industry. The webinar is therefore of interest to geomodellers, reservoir geophysicists, rock physicists, reservoir engineers, and asset managers. The webinar is also of interest to postgraduate students studying an applied geoscience topic.

 

About the Lecturer

Dr. Jörg Herwanger is a Director at MP-Geomechanics, a specialist consultancy and software company in applied oilfield geomechanics. Jörg’s career in the petroleum industry spans 15 years, ranging from R&D positions, consulting and software development and commercialization. His main contributions to the industry have been in the advancement of time-lapse seismic technology, the integration of seismic data and geomechanical models and the application of 3D and 4D geomechanical models for field development planning. His current work focusses on the development of a novel fully coupled simulator that simultaneously solves fluid-flow and geomechanical equations to address reservoir management issues. Jörg has been an EAGE Distinguished Lecturer during 2007-2008, the EAGE Education Tour Lecturer on “Seismic Geomechanics” during 2011-2012, and currently serves as Education Officer on the board of EAGE.
 

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Rock Physics Modelling of Compaction and Cementation during burial
Instructor Dr. Michelle Ellis
Duration 45 min + 15 minutes Q&A
Main Topic(s): Petrophysics
Sub Topic(s): Rock Physics
Language English
Date + Time
see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

As sediments are buried they undergo both mechanical and geochemical processes that reduce the original depositional porosities. Among them, compaction and cementation are two of the most important factors that decide the final porosity of these rocks. To understand the resulting petrophysical properties and their corresponding elastic response remains an important and challenging topic for rock physics. 

In this lecture we will explore how cementation and compaction affects the properties of the rock and review rock physic models which estimate the effective properties. A hybrid rock physics model, which considers both compaction and cementation effects, will be presented. This model considers the full burial history of the rock rather than individual processes. The overall modelling strategy combines the unconsolidated sand model, the contact cement model, and an inclusion model. 

The workflow allows us to perform quantitative analysis and interpret different porosity reduction stages within reservoir rocks which have undergone severe mechanical and geochemical processes. With the guide of geological information, depositional and burial history, this workflow also provides a means to predict the geophysical responses of reservoir rocks, away from well control. The modelling workflow is demonstrated on well log data and published laboratory data.

Participants' Profile

Those interested in rock physics and improving the understanding of the geophysical response of reservoir properties.

About the Lecturer

Michelle Ellis is a rock physicist and systems applications product manager with 15 years research and 8 years industry experience mainly supporting the oil and gas industry. Her main areas of expertise are in elastic and electrical anisotropy modelling, multiphysics interpretation, laboratory physical property measurements, reservoir characterization, gas hydrates and CO2 sequestration modelling and compaction modelling. She is currently an independent rock physics consultant for Rock AI.

Prior to this she was a Senior Rock Physicist and Product Owner for Rock Solid Images where she developed novel rock models and workflows for multiphysics reservoir interpretation. She was also involved in implementing those models and workflows in RSI’s rock physics modelling software package (iMOSS). She undertook 2 postdoctoral projects, one at the National Environmental Research Council (NERC) and the other at University of Southampton (UK). She obtained her PhD in Marine Geophysics from the University of Southampton investigating the elastic and electrical properties of gas hydrate saturated sediments.

 

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Seismic AVO: When data meets theory
Instructor Patrick Connolly
Duration 1 hr + 15 minutes Q&A
Disciplines Seismic reservoir characterisation, Seismic inversion
Language English
Date + Time
see calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

In this talk I will discuss how to reconcile the elegant theory underpinning seismic AVO with the inevitably messy complications that arise when applying the theory to real data.

Simple theory shows that combinations of AVO attributes, intercept and gradient, correlate to a high degree of accuracy with a wide range of elastic property reflectivities. These combinations, parameterised as coordinate rotations with rotation angle chi, can form the basis of qualitative attribute analysis or quantitative inversion for reservoir properties.   Unfortunately making accurate intercept and, particularly, gradient measurements is, if not impossible, then certainly very difficult meaning that blind application of the theory may not provide good results. 

I will describe the sources of gradient measurement errors and show how to adapt the theory to help mitigate measurement errors.  This leads to an alternative model for seismic noise and uncertainty; an increasingly important topic as we move towards greater use of probabilistic seismic inversion methods.

Participants' Profile

Geophysicists involved in seismic analysis and quantitative interpretation, data processing and general interpretation.  Geologists wishing to gain deeper insight into seismic data applications.

About the Lecturer

Patrick Connolly retired from BP as Senior Advisor for Seismic Analysis in 2015 after a long career in data processing, interpretation, analysis and research.  He is now an independent consultant mostly provided training to oil company staff.

Patrick was a 2007 EAGE Distinguished Lecturer and a 2010 SEG Distinguished Lecturer.  In 2001 he was awarded the SEG Virgil Kauffman Gold Medal for his 
 

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DLP Webinars on Data Science

Automated top salt interpretation using a deep convolutional net
Instructor Oddgeir Gramstad
Duration 20-30 minutes + 15 minutes Q&A
Disciplines Top salt interpretation
Subdiscipline
Machine learning
Language English
Date + Time
See calendar of webinars or on request

Webinar description

We present a new automated workflow based on machine learning which can significantly reduce the amount of manual interpretation of the top salt boundary. Manual interpretation of top salt on large seismic surveys with complex salt geometry is a time-consuming task. The interpreters typically need to scan through the seismic volume and pick control points line-by-line. It can take more than a month to complete a top salt interpretation. In this new method, a convolutional neural net is designed to detect the top of salt boundaries and the training data are picked as 2D images on a manual top salt interpretation in a specific seismic survey. The trained network is then evaluated both on the seismic data used in the training and on another seismic data not used in the training. In both cases we can produce a top salt interpretation that covers the main parts of the corresponding manual interpretations. The results can be further improved by adding more training data. This new automated workflow has the potential to reduce the interpretation turnaround time of top of salt from approximately a month or more and down to hours.

Participants' Profile

Geoscientists, geologists, geophysicists, salt interpreters and data scientists.

About the Lecturer

Odgeir GramstadOddgeir Gramstad has a MSc. in cybernetics from the University of Stavanger in 2005 and he is working as a Senior Research Scientist at Schlumberger Stavanger Research (SSR). He has worked with developing different tools for automated interpretation of seismic data and attributes including classification and pattern recognition. The two main technologies are the Seismic DNA and the Extrema interpretation method, which have been tested and applied on different real data sets world-wide together with different oil companies. Oddgeir is currently working on developing new machine learning applications for G&G applications, including automated interpretation of top and base salt.

 

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    DLP Webinars on Engineering

Exploration discoveries and future trends
Instructor Andrew Latham
Duration 20 minutes + 15 minutes Q&A
Main Topic Oil and gas exploration
Sub Topic
Recent giant finds 
Language English

 

Webinar description

The oil and gas exploration industry has fixed its broken economics and emerged from the recent oil price downturn in good health. But the industry is now much smaller, with fewer companies drilling fewer wells. New field volumes discovered have fallen to 70-year lows.
New plays and frontiers are often at the heart of the improved profitability. Companies that are prepared to take greater exploration risks are reaping greater rewards. This lecture reviews some of the most important new discoveries behind these trends.

Participants' Profile

Anyone interested in big picture trends in oil and gas exploration, looking for an overview of the most important new plays and basins to emerge in recent years.

About the Lecturer

Andrew LathamDr Andrew Latham has over 25 years industry experience and currently leads Wood Mackenzie’s global exploration research.
He started his career in 1990 as an international new ventures geologist with Ranger Oil. Later, as Ranger focused on West Africa, he became project geologist for Angola.
Andrew graduated from Imperial College, London, with a BSc Honours degree in Geology, and holds a PhD in Geology from University College, Cardiff.
 

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